How to Create Screenshots in Windows, Linux or on Your Mac

Posted on December 16th, 1969 | By Gerd Meissner


Here's a quick tip if you frequently need to create screenshots on your computer - on the job, for manuals and instructions, or for your personal blog.

I don't know about you, but I soon got tired of trying to identify the right screenshot programs for the current versions of each of the computing platforms I work on, Linux, Windows and Mac. (For mobile, here's how to take screenshots on the iPhone - no app required.)

Not that there's a lack of screenshot software out there. The thing is, many programs are cumbersome to use, others freeze up right when you need them most, and then there are the ones where the developers threw in everything and the kitchen sink, but only allowed for a limited range of image file types. And so on.

Once again, the Cloud saves the day. ScreenCloud, to be precise, a free program and cloud-based service created in January 2012 by Norwegian programmer Olav S Thoresen.



His intention was to provide an easy to use, cross-platform way under Linux, Windows and Mac OS X to create and share screenshots. As far as I am concerned, he succeeded big time, by focusing on ease of use and simplicity.

Once you have downloaded the program version for your operating system,

  1. you take a screenshot by simply clicking the ScreenCloud tray icon; if you prefer it more complicated or want to exercise your memory, you can use three hotkeys;

  2. ScreenCloud automatically uploads your screen image to your free ScreenCloud.net account or to your own server, or you can store it locally on your hard disk;

  3. the link to screenshots uploaded to the ScreenCloud is automatically copied to your clipboard.

What cinched it for me was that ScreenCloud even offers the option to store files to a server via FTP, and also to 3rd-party cloud file storage and sharing services like Dropbox.

Screenshots are digital throw-away items. You don't want them to fill up your hard drive. But if you create them for business, you might also use some of them repeatedly, so you don't necessarily want to delete them, either.

Also, most screenshots don't contain sensitive information and are intended for publication anyway.

So, even for those among us who are still hesitant to store stuff in the Cloud, saving and sharing screenshots through a free Cloud service could make good sense.

Did you find this tip useful? Don't miss out on more posts like this in the future. Make your blog or business look and perform better on a budget - sign up to receive How-to Tips emails from my blog here! Promised: No spam.







Conflicting modification on October 9, 2014 at 6:56:43 PM:
Here's a quick tip if you frequently need to create screenshots on your computer - on the job, for manuals and instructions, or for your personal blog.

I don't know about you, but I soon got tired of trying to identify the right screenshot programs for the current versions of each of the computing platforms I work on, Linux, Windows and Mac. (For mobile, here's how to take screenshots on the iPhone - no app required.)

Not that there's a lack of screenshot software out there. The thing is, many programs are cumbersome to use, others freeze up right when you need them most, and then there are the ones where the developers threw in everything and the kitchen sink, but only allowed for a limited range of image file types. And so on.

Once again, the Cloud saves the day. ScreenCloud, to be precise, a free program and cloud-based service created in January 2012 by Norwegian programmer Olav S Thoresen.



His intention was to provide an easy to use, cross-platform way under Linux, Windows and Mac OS X to create and share screenshots. As far as I am concerned, he succeeded big time, by focusing on ease of use and simplicity.

Once you have downloaded the program version for your operating system,

  1. you take a screenshot by simply clicking the ScreenCloud tray icon; if you prefer it more complicated or want to exercise your memory, you can use three hotkeys;

  2. ScreenCloud automatically uploads your screen image to your free ScreenCloud.net account or to your own server, or you can store it locally on your hard disk;

  3. the link to screenshots uploaded to the ScreenCloud is automatically copied to your clipboard.

What cinched it for me was that ScreenCloud even offers the option to store files to a server via FTP, and also to 3rd-party cloud file storage and sharing services like Dropbox.

Screenshots are digital throw-away items. You don't want them to fill up your hard drive. But if you create them for business, you might also use some of them repeatedly, so you don't necessarily want to delete them, either.

Also, most screenshots don't contain sensitive information and are intended for publication anyway.

So, even for those among us who are still hesitant to store stuff in the Cloud, saving and sharing screenshots through a free Cloud service could make good sense.

Did you find this tip useful? Don't miss out on more posts like this in the future. Make your blog or business look and perform better on a budget - sign up to receive How-to Tips emails from my blog here! Promised: No spam.







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Gerd Meissner

Gerd's how-to tips and short reviews of ebooks, apps, tools, deals, freebies - free cloud space, data visualization and more.


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